Facebase

Embed from Getty Images While you are most likely not a criminal, it is likely that the police have a digital version of your face on file. This is because most states put driver’s license photos
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Embed from Getty Images While you are most likely not a criminal, it is likely that the police have a digital version of your face on file. This is because most states put driver’s license photos into a database accessible to the police—and, one would assume, the federal government. The system works in conjunction with facial recognition software (like Facebook uses to identify people in your photos) to identify suspects. For example, if someone robs a convenience store and the police do not recognize them, the image from the surveillance camera can be matched against the database that could contain your face. Ideally, the software would generate a short list that includes the perpetrator. Problematically, the software could generate a list of innocent people who might then end up in unpleasant interactions with the state. There are, of course, some practical issues with the current technology. One is that the photos the police have of suspects tend to be of low quality, thus. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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