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Pregnancy, Birth, and Medicine

[Revised entry by Rebecca Kukla and Katherine Wayne on October 24, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] When philosophers have turned their attention to the ethics of reproduction, they have
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[Revised entry by Rebecca Kukla and Katherine Wayne on October 24, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] When philosophers have turned their attention to the ethics of reproduction, they have mostly focused on abortion, and to a lesser extent on various assisted reproductive technologies used to create a pregnancy. However, a number of thorny ethical issues can arise during the course of a continuing pregnancy, labor, and birth, and these are receiving growing attention in bioethics. This article is restricted to a discussion of such issues. See the entries on feminist perspectives on reproduction and the family,...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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