The Empire of Habit: John Locke, Discipline, and the Origins of Liberalism

2016.10.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Baltes, The Empire of Habit: John Locke, Discipline, and the Origins of Liberalism, University of Rochester Press, 2016,
Philosophy News image
2016.10.11 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Baltes, The Empire of Habit: John Locke, Discipline, and the Origins of Liberalism, University of Rochester Press, 2016, 157pp., $80.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781580465618. Reviewed by Douglas Casson, St Olaf College The title of this work is taken from Locke's discussion of association in the Conduct of the Understanding. Locke praises those with "a vigour of mind able to contest the empire of habit, and look into its own principles." By resisting the power of habitual associations, such individuals exhibit a freedom "which few men have the notion of in themselves, and fewer are allowed the practice of by others." (CU §41). Intellectual freedom, for Locke, involves contesting the empire of habit. Yet, as John Baltes observes, Locke not only celebrates resistance to habit's power, he also deploys that power for his own purposes. In his writings on epistemology, education, and governance, Locke appeals to. . .

Continue reading . . .

News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

blog comments powered by Disqus