How to write a grant proposal

Whatever its scale or ambition, a grant proposal aims to do two things: to show that a particular project needs to be supported by a funder and to show why some individual, group or organization is
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Whatever its scale or ambition, a grant proposal aims to do two things: to show that a particular project needs to be supported by a funder and to show why some individual, group, or organization is the right one—the best one—to carry out the project. Showing the “need” is largely an exercise in argumentative writing. It’s argumentative not in the hostile, red-faced, fist-shaking sense but in the classical sense of establishing a claim, developing and supporting it, and taking into account the concerns of a reasonable but skeptical audience. In a grant, your claim is that some project is necessary, and you can support this claim by identifying the gap in services or gap in knowledge that the work addresses. The flip side of need is impact, so you’ll usually want to go beyond necessity to showing how things will be different once the work is completed. If your project is supporting dental education for rural populations, you’ll want statistics and quotes that explain why it. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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