States of Affairs

[Revised entry by Mark Textor on October 6, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Philosophers connect sentences with various different items, such as thoughts, facts and states
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[Revised entry by Mark Textor on October 6, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Philosophers connect sentences with various different items, such as thoughts, facts and states of affairs. Thoughts are either true or false in an absolute sense, never both or neither. A sentence such as "Socrates is wise" is true (false) in virtue of expressing the true (false) thought that Socrates is wise. Thoughts are also the contents of propositional attitudes like belief and desire. For example, John's belief that Vulcan is a planet is a relation between him and the thought that Vulcan is a planet. Since...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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