Drugs, Race, Crime & Health

The war on drugs is perhaps the longest and least successful war waged by the United States. One of the main problems is, as Walt Kelley said, “we have met the enemy and he is us.” Which is to say
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The war on drugs is perhaps the longest and least successful war waged by the United States. One of the main problems is, as Walt Kelley said, “we have met the enemy and he is us.” Which is to say that the war on drugs is largely a civil war and most of the casualties are Americans. While some regard the war on drugs as a battle of virtue against vice, there is a compelling case that many of the drug laws were motivated by racism. For example, San Francisco’s 1875 law against opium was apparently based on the fear that Chinese men were luring white women into opium dens so as to have sex with them. This was followed by laws against cocaine (motivated largely by racism towards blacks) and then by laws against marijuana (motivated largely by biases against Mexicans). The war on drugs proper began in 1971 with Richard Nixon’s declaration and following presidents followed suit with varying degrees of enthusiasm. President Bill Clinton, eager to appear tough on crime, escalated the war in. . .

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News source: Talking Philosophy

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