Periphrastic puzzles

Let us say that a sentence is periphrastic if and only if there is a single word in that sentence such that we can remove the word and the result (i) is grammatical, and (ii) has the same truth
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Let us say that a sentence is periphrastic if and only if there is a single word in that sentence such that we can remove the word and the result (i) is grammatical, and (ii) has the same truth value as the original sentence. For example: [1]        Roy murdered someone. is periphrastic, since it is equivalent to: [2]        Roy murdered. Thus, a sentence is not periphrastic if, for any word in the sentence, the result of removing the word is not grammatical, or the result of removing that word has a different truth value. It should be noted that I am introducing “periphrastic” as a technical term here, and its use as defined above is different from (but connected to) its meaning in everyday English (further, the meaning here is significantly different from its technical meaning in grammar). The notion of a sentence being periphrastic in this sense is simple, and at first glance we might think that we will always be able to determine whether a sentence is periphrastic merely by. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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