Collingwood's Aesthetics

[Revised entry by Gary Kemp on September 10, 2016. Changes to: Bibliography] R. G. Collingwood (1889 - 1943) was primarily a general philosopher and philosopher of history, and considered his work
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[Revised entry by Gary Kemp on September 10, 2016. Changes to: Bibliography] R. G. Collingwood (1889 - 1943) was primarily a general philosopher and philosopher of history, and considered his work in aesthetics - the principal work being his The Principles of Art (1938) - as secondary. But the work in aesthetics has enjoyed a persistent readership that continues into the present. In the years after WWII he was probably the most widely read and influential aesthetician to have written in English since Addison, Hutcheson and Hume (not counting Ruskin as an aesthetician), and to this day continues to make his way into anthologies as a principal proponent of the expressive theory of art. In the field of the philosophy of history, Collingwood famously held the doctrine of 'Re-enactment': since the subject is human beings in action, the historian cannot achieve understanding by describing what happened from an external point of view, but must elicit in the reader's own mind the thoughts. . .

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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