Against narrowness in philosophy

If you asked many people today, they would say that one of the limitations of analytic philosophy is its narrowness. Whereas in previous centuries philosophers took on projects of broad scope,
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If you asked many people today, they would say that one of the limitations of analytic philosophy is its narrowness. Whereas in previous centuries philosophers took on projects of broad scope, today’s philosophers typically deal with smaller issues. Their interest is to consider a few problems and to examine them in detail. The result is that many philosophers tend to work in a few fields and to avoid the breadth of philosophy’s historical forebears. While this is true of many philosophers today this isn’t true of them all. A good example of this is the philosopher Philip Kitcher, whose work covers an impressive range of subjects. He is one of the few philosophers capable of and interested in working in a number of areas. Kitcher’s early interests included work in mathematics. He earned his undergraduate degree in 1969 at Cambridge University, focusing on mathematics and the history and philosophy of science. After this, he left for the graduate program in philosophy at Princeton. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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