Protecting our children from profanity

We adults are careful about swearing around our kids. We don’t want bad language to confuse or corrupt or otherwise harm them. As Steven Pinker says in passing while talking about profanity in The
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We adults are careful about swearing around our kids. We don’t want bad language to confuse or corrupt or otherwise harm them. As Steven Pinker says in passing while talking about profanity in The Stuff of Thought (2007), “if some people would rather not explain to their young children what a blow job is, there should be television channels that don’t force them to,” and there are. We have every right to be protective of our children even if we don’t have a reason. So, we protect our children from profanity—or try to protect them, anyway. Usually, we aren’t on the spot to police their speech at crucial moments, when they’re on the playground or huddled in those cute little gangs they form. If we’re honest, we have to admit that protecting them isn’t our only concern. We can’t bear the scrutiny of disapproving adults, and they’re everywhere. We think—as do said disapproving adults—that we ought to be ashamed of our kids for their profanity and ourselves for letting them grow into. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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