Paradoxes logical and literary

For many months now this column has been examining logical/mathematical paradoxes. Strictly speaking, a paradox is a kind of argument. In literary theory, some sentences are also called paradoxes,
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For many months now this column has been examining logical/mathematical paradoxes. Strictly speaking, a paradox is a kind of argument – for example, in some of my academic work I define paradoxes as follows: A paradox is an argument that: Begins with premises that seem uncontroversially true. Proceeds via reasoning that seems uncontroversially valid. Arrives at a conclusion that is a contradiction, is false, or is otherwise absurd, inappropriate, or unacceptable. Often, however, such as in the case of the Liar Sentence: “This sentence is not true.” there is a central claim that seems to be the root of the paradox, and in such cases we often talk as if the sentence itself is the paradox, rather than the argument. Let’s adopt this informal usage here. Thus, on this looser way of speaking, sentences that cannot be true and cannot be false are paradoxical. We’ll call the kind of sentences just described “philosophically paradoxical”, or paradoxicalP. In literary theory, some sentences. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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