Sartor resartus, or some thoughts on the origin of the word “cloth” and the history of clothes

I keep clawing at the bars of the cage I built for myself. But first a digression. Walter W. Skeat wrote numerous notes on English etymology, some of which he eventually put together and published
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I keep clawing at the bars of the cage I built for myself. But first a digression. Walter W. Skeat wrote numerous notes on English etymology, some of which he eventually put together and published in book form. Much to my regret, not too many kl-words attracted his attention. But I was amused to discover that the verb clop means not only the sound made by shoes or hoofs but also “to cling, adhere to.” Clop is a variant of clap, a sound imitative word like click—clack—cluck, but its homonym (“to cling”) illustrates the point I have recently made in this series, namely that kl-words may exchange hostages. My example was the English verb cling “to adhere to” versus German klingen “to ring.” Clop-clop-clop                                        Clap-clap-clap Skeat also devoted some space to clove, the troublesome noun touched upon not long ago. He suggested the Italian origin of clove, the English form being “a compromise between the F. clou and the Ital. chiovo.” In my essay, I said. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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