Meaning without Representation: Essays on Truth, Expression, Normativity, and Naturalism

2016.08.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Steven Gross, Nicholas Tebben, and Michael Williams (eds.), Meaning without Representation: Essays on Truth, Expression,
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2016.08.08 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Steven Gross, Nicholas Tebben, and Michael Williams (eds.), Meaning without Representation: Essays on Truth, Expression, Normativity, and Naturalism, Oxford University Press, 2015, 379pp., $85.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198722199. Reviewed by Delia Belleri, University of Vienna The essays contained in this collective volume all revolve around the question of whether the function of language is to represent the world. There is more than one interpretation of this question, as Nicholas Tebben rightly observes in the Introduction (p. 6). Still, it seems possible to gather the contributions under three main headings. The first has to do with truth deflationism and the idea that being true is not connected with metaphysically loaded relations like "representing the world" or "corresponding to the facts". The second has to do with semantic expressivism and the thesis that language does not serve to represent the world. . .

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