Utilitarianism and the Ethics of War

2016.08.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William H. Shaw, Utilitarianism and the Ethics of War, Routledge, 2016, 183pp., $44.65 (pbk), ISBN 9781138998964. Reviewed
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2016.08.07 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews William H. Shaw, Utilitarianism and the Ethics of War, Routledge, 2016, 183pp., $44.65 (pbk), ISBN 9781138998964. Reviewed by Nick Fotion, Emory University The first, and shortest, portion of Shaw's book deals mainly with utilitarianism, the second with war. I follow his footsteps. Shaw presents his rather classical portrait of utilitarianism as:  Utilitarianism holds, first, that a state of affairs is good or bad to some degree . . . only in virtue of the well-being of the lives of particular individuals . . . Second, utilitarians believe that the good is additive. (23) In short, utilitarianism is consequentialist and welfarist. It is also egalitarian in that it takes everyone's welfare into account. Shaw defends his favorite theory in two stages. The first has him thinking like an act-utilitarian, that is, as one who does his thinking on a case-by-case basis. What should an act-utilitarian say... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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