How Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity without Debating Moral Realism

2016.07.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kenneth R. Westphal, How Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity without Debating Moral Realism,
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2016.07.19 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Kenneth R. Westphal, How Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity without Debating Moral Realism, Oxford University Press, 2016, 252pp., $65.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780198747055. Reviewed by Richard McCarty, East Carolina University In this forcefully argued contribution to the theory of justice, Kenneth R. Westphal looks back to Hume and Kant as reformers of an earlier "natural law" tradition. Each is said to have developed a method of justifying principles of justice, called "natural law constructivism," that remains "neutral about moral realism, about the contrast between 'consequentialism' and 'deontology', about the putative value of human agency, and about intrinsic or extrinsic links between reasons and motives" (3-4). This is history of philosophy done right, telling us what people thought some centuries ago, and why we should think the same. It is the admirable work of a mature. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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