Clouds with and without a silver lining

Engl. cloud belongs so obviously with clod and its kin that there might not even be a question­­­­ of its origin (just one more lump), but for the first recorded sense of clūd in Old English, which
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Engl. cloud belongs so obviously with clod and its kin that there might not even be a question­­­­ of its origin (just one more lump), but for the first recorded sense of clūd in Old English, which was “rock, cliff.” Some etymologists even doubted whether we are dealing with the same word (Skeat’s reference to the old root meaning “stick together” does not go far enough for “rock”): perhaps in the remote past English had clūd “rock” and its homonym clūd “cloud”? This was the opinion of Friedrich Kluge. I could not find the place in the early editions of his dictionary where he says so (perhaps this statement occurs elsewhere; unfortunately, the reference does not show up in my bibliography). However, in 1899 a thin book called English Etymology appeared in London. Its authors were Friedrich Kluge and Fredrick Lutz, but Lutz must have been only the translator of the German text. Although the booklet was widely consulted, it contains little durable information. In the entry cloud, one. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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