Epistemic Angst: Radical Skepticism and the Groundlessness of Our Believing

2016.06.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Duncan Pritchard, Epistemic Angst: Radical Skepticism and the Groundlessness of Our Believing, Princeton University Press, 2016,
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2016.06.29 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Duncan Pritchard, Epistemic Angst: Radical Skepticism and the Groundlessness of Our Believing, Princeton University Press, 2016, 239pp., $35.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691167237. Reviewed by Annalisa Coliva, University of California, Irvine Duncan Pritchard has written an ambitious and thought-provoking book, which aims to integrate elements of Ludwig Wittgenstein's On Certainty and of John McDowell's disjunctivism to provide a solution to the problem of external world skepticism. Indeed, it is a significant contribution to the rising trend of "hinge epistemology".[1] A trend that, as the label suggests, aims to develop a Wittgenstein-inspired epistemology. Pritchard's dialectical setup will be familiar to connoisseurs of hinge epistemology. For he contends that scepticism should be understood as a paradox, which, starting with prima facie acceptable premises, leads to the unacceptable conclusion that we do not. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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