A timeout: the methods of etymology

I expected that my series on dogs would inspire a torrent of angry comments. After all, dog is one of the most enigmatic words in English etymology, but the responses were very few. I am, naturally,
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I expected that my series on dogs would inspire a torrent of angry comments. After all, dog is one of the most enigmatic words in English etymology, but the responses were very few. I am, naturally, grateful to those who found it possible to say something about the subject I was discussing for five weeks, especially to those who liked the essays. As I have observed in the past, though I am supposed to love my enemies, I have a warmer feeling for those who are fond of me.  At the moment, my dogs sleep in relative isolation, and that is where I’ll leave them. But suddenly my rather trivial old post on strawberry was picked up by MSN News, Hacker News, and Reddit, and thousands of people participated in the “chat.” Who could predict those five (three) minutes of evanescent fame? However, I also received a serious private letter. Our correspondent expressed surprise that I constantly refer to onomatopoeia and sound symbolism and asked me to clarify my attitude toward this matter. Summer. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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