Means, Ends, and Persons: The Meaning and Psychological Dimensions of Kant's Humanity Formula

2016.06.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robert Audi, Means, Ends, and Persons: The Meaning and Psychological Dimensions of Kant's Humanity Formula, Oxford University
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2016.06.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Robert Audi, Means, Ends, and Persons: The Meaning and Psychological Dimensions of Kant's Humanity Formula, Oxford University Press, 2016, 172pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780190251550. Reviewed by Kenneth Walden, Dartmouth College Depending on how you count, there are between three and 92 formulations of the Categorical Imperative in Kant's Groundwork. One can make a convincing case that the most useful of these for ethical theorists is the Formula of Humanity: "Act so that you use humanity, as much in your own person as in the person of every other, always at the same time as end and never merely as means." (4:429) To most ears this sounds better and certainly more practicable than Kant's first formulation. We all recognize the complaint in "you used me" even if we don't see the problem with acting on a maxim whose universalization cannot be willed. And yet on closer inspection, the Formula of Humanity raises. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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