Leaving the kennel, or a farewell to dogs

My series on the etymology of dog and other nouns with canine roots has come to an end, but, before turning to another subject, I would like to say a few moderately famous last words. For some
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My series on the etymology of dog and other nouns with canine roots has come to an end, but, before turning to another subject, I would like to say a few moderately famous last words. For some reason, it is, as already mentioned, just the names of the dog that are particularly obscure in many languages (the same holds for bitch and others). The great historical linguist Antoine Meillet once wrote that all attempts to reconstruct the origin of Latin canis are futile. Meillet was prone to pontificating and shedding discouraging words of wisdom. Thus, more than a century ago, he observed that all the good etymologies had already been found, while all the new ones were bad. Since I pride myself on offering three, perhaps even four new convincing etymologies, I feel slighted. However, as regards canis, he may have been right.  Trouble arises even when everything appears to be clear. Consider greyhound. It is of course a compound. The first element is related to Old Icelandic grey “bitch,”. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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