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Our Fate: Essays on God and Free Will

2016.05.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Martin Fischer, Our Fate: Essays on God and Free Will, Oxford University Press, 2016, 243pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.05.25 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews John Martin Fischer, Our Fate: Essays on God and Free Will, Oxford University Press, 2016, 243pp., $74.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199311293. Reviewed by Martijn Boot, Waseda University Contemporary debates about free will are dominated by two questions: ‘Is causal determinism true?’ and ‘Is free will compatible with causal determinism?’ These issues are important with respect to the question of to what extent we are morally responsible for our choices and actions. Moral responsibility cannot be detached from some form of free will and self-determination. Parallel to the issue of (in)compatibilism of free will and causal determinism is the question of whether free will and moral responsibility are compatible with divine foreknowledge. John Martin Fischer investigates the relationship between divine foreknowledge, human freedom and moral responsibility. His book is a collection of eleven. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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