Disability: Definitions, Models, Experience

[Revised entry by David Wasserman, Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein, and Daniel Putnam on May 23, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Philosophers have always lived among people who could
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[Revised entry by David Wasserman, Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein, and Daniel Putnam on May 23, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Philosophers have always lived among people who could not see, walk, or hear; who had limited mobility, comprehension or longevity, or chronic illnesses of various sorts. And yet philosophical interest in these conditions was piecemeal and occasional until the past hundred or so years. Some of these conditions were cited in litanies of life's hardships or evils; some were the vehicle for inquiries into the relationship between human faculties and human knowledge [see SEP entry on "Molyneux's Problem"]. But the treatment of...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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