How to be good

Recently philosophers and scientists have tried to identify how to make the world better by making people more likely to do good rather than evil. This same problem has also faced those interested
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‘How to be good?’ is the pre-eminent question for ethics, although one that philosophers and ethicists seldom address head on. It was the question Plato posed in a slightly different form in The Republic when he said, “We are discussing no trivial subject, but how a man should live.” Marcus Aurelius thought he knew the answer. When he unequivocally stated in his Meditations “A King’s lot: to do good and be damned.” He was himself a king and ruled almost all of the world that was known to him. He could with impunity both do good and be damned. Edward Gibbon famously remarked that “If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the human race was most happy and prosperous he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus.” Marcus Aurelius, the father of Commodus ruled for the last 19 years of this period. Recently philosophers and scientists have tried to identify how to make the. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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