Philosopher of the month: Thomas Hobbes

Hobbes is remembered as the author of one of the greatest of books on political philosophy ever written, Leviathan, in which he argued with a precision reached by few other thinkers. He was famously
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This May, the OUP Philosophy team honors Thomas Hobbes (April 5, 1588 – December 4, 1679) as their Philosopher of the Month. Hobbes is remembered as the author of one of the greatest of books on political philosophy ever written, Leviathan, in which he argued with a precision reached by few other thinkers. He was famously a cynic, holding that human action was motivated entirely by selfish concerns, notably fear of death. Hobbes studied at Oxford and devoted his long life to private tutoring and study. In early life he traveled abroad as tutor to the Cavendish family, and in 1604, aware of signs of the impending English civil war, Hobbes moved to Paris where he could return to his writings in some security. After eleven years, Hobbes returned to England in late 1651, when his most famous book, Leviathan, had been published a few months earlier and was beginning to cause debate and to make enemies for its author. Whatever the many merits of Hobbes’s other works, there is no doubt. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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