Markets without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests

2016.04.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski, Markets without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests, Routledge, 2016, 239pp.,
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2016.04.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski, Markets without Limits: Moral Virtues and Commercial Interests, Routledge, 2016, 239pp., $39.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780415737357. Reviewed by Jonathan Anomaly, Duke University/University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Philosophers like Michael Sandel and Gerald Cohen have argued that as markets expand into new areas of life, important character virtues wither and valuable social relationships decay.[1]Other philosophers like Debra Satz and Elizabeth Anderson direct their criticism at specific markets ranging from sex and surrogacy to kidneys and votes (though they don't always think moral objections justify legal prohibitions).[2] Giving away morally significant goods and services is fine, even noble, but selling them is wrong. Jason Brennan and Peter M. Jaworski's book is a welcome challenge to this view. The authors define a market as "the voluntary exchange of goods and. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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