Temporal liars

One of the most famous, and most widely discussed, paradoxes is the Liar paradox. The Liar sentence is true if and only if it is false, and thus can be neither (unless it can be both). The variants
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One of the most famous, and most widely discussed, paradoxes is the Liar paradox, which arises when we consider the status of the Liar sentence: This sentence is false. The Liar sentence is true if and only if it is false, and thus can be neither (unless it can be both). The variants of the Liar that I want to consider in this instalment arise by taking the implicit temporal aspect of the word “is” in the Liar paradox seriously. In other words, we can understand the Liar sentence as saying of itself that it is true at this very moment. Thus, the Liar is equivalent to: This sentence is currently, at this very moment false. But what if we replace the present-tense “is” with future or past-tense verbs such as “will be”, “was”, and the like? Before considering such constructions, we need to be a bit clear about how we are going to understand various tensed expressions. Informally, if I say “It will always be the case that P”, I might be claiming that P is true right now and will continue. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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