Philosophy in a Meaningless Life: A System of Nihilism, Consciousness and Reality

2016.04.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews James Tartaglia, Philosophy in a Meaningless Life: A System of Nihilism, Consciousness and Reality, Bloomsbury, 2016, 218pp.,
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2016.04.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews James Tartaglia, Philosophy in a Meaningless Life: A System of Nihilism, Consciousness and Reality, Bloomsbury, 2016, 218pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781474247702. Reviewed by Guy Bennett-Hunter, University of Edinburgh There are many philosophical arguments for the conclusion that life has meaning. Therefore, to argue for nihilism (the claim that, not only life but the whole of reality is meaningless (ix)) is to claim that every argument for meaning in life contains some error. This ambitious undertaking is apparently central to James Tartaglia's book: as he bluntly puts it, 'nihilism is just a fact.' (19). I have in print endorsed one of the arguments for life's meaning which Tartaglia explicitly opposes.[1] But, while I disagree with this apparently central claim, I am sympathetic to another view for which this book makes an intriguing case: that 'tending the space of transcendence' is one of philosophy's. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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