Etymology gleanings for March 2016

Preparation for the Spelling Congress is underway. The more people will send in their proposals, the better. On the other hand (or so it seems to me), the fewer people participate in this event and
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Spelling reform Preparation for the Spelling Congress is underway. The more people will send in their proposals, the better. On the other hand (or so it seems to me), the fewer people participate in this event and the less it costs in terms of labor/labour and money, the more successful it will turn out to be. The fate of English spelling has been discussed in passionate terms since at least the 1840s. As early as 1848 Alexander J. Ellis wrote that spelling English is the most difficult of human attainments, that English spelling is the most foul, strange, and unnatural there is (his emphasis), and many other equally soothing things. Ellis’s scholarship arouses nothing but admiration, but one may agree with the verdict of The Westminster Review that “if on the subject phonetics he be a little mad, verily much learning hath made him so.” I am addressing those who, at least provisionally, agree that English spelling should be reformed. The chances that such people will reach consensus. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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