The God-man resurrected: a philosophical problem for the Incarnation

Today is Easter Sunday for the majority of the world’s 2.4 billion Christians (most Orthodox Christians will wait until May 1st to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus). After the long penitential
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Today is Easter Sunday for the majority of the world’s 2.4 billion Christians (most Orthodox Christians will wait until 1 May to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus). After the long penitential season of Lent, Christians are greeting each other with joyful exclamations of “He is risen,” and hearing in glad response, “He is risen indeed, hallelujah!” That Christ rose is surely wonder enough, but who it was that rose is what makes Easter the most important feast on the Christian calendar. According to the traditional teaching of Christianity, the one who died and rose is none other than the ‘God-man’, the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity, Jesus Christ, incarnate among us as a human. He shared the divine nature with the Father and Holy Spirit, yet took on a flesh-and-blood human nature of the same type as yours or mine. This teaching, which elicits adulation from Christians, can equally elicit perplexity from non-Christians. For how could it be that one and the same. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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