Knowledge and Virtue in Early Stoicism

2016.03.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Håvard Løkke, Knowledge and Virtue in Early Stoicism, Springer, 2015, 134pp., $129.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789400721524. Reviewed by
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2016.03.22 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Håvard Løkke, Knowledge and Virtue in Early Stoicism, Springer, 2015, 134pp., $129.00 (hbk), ISBN 9789400721524. Reviewed by Nathan Powers, State University of New York at Albany The Stoics thought it possible for a human to live free from error, that is, with fully warranted confidence in all of your beliefs (including those beliefs that serve as your motives for action). This is not the normal condition of humans, of course. But according to the Stoics it is in an important sense the natural human condition. Our natural tendencies are such that if they develop without hindrance or perversion -- a big if -- we will come to live like that: as wise persons or sages. In this brief and rather idiosyncratic monograph, Håvard Løkke attempts to reconstruct the epistemological theory that underwrote the early Stoics' picture of life without error as the attainable human ideal. Crucial to this picture is the... . . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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