Biological Information

[Revised entry by Peter Godfrey-Smith and Kim Sterelny on March 23, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Since the 1950s, the concept of information has acquired a strikingly prominent role
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[Revised entry by Peter Godfrey-Smith and Kim Sterelny on March 23, 2016. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Since the 1950s, the concept of information has acquired a strikingly prominent role in many parts of biology. This enthusiasm extends far beyond domains where the concept might seem to have an obvious application, such as the biological study of perception, cognition, and language, and now reaches into the most basic parts of biological theory. Hormones and other cellular products through which physiological systems are regulated are typically described as signals. Descriptions of how genes play their causal role in metabolic processes and development are routinely given in terms of...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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