Paradox of Energy

That life is energy, is evident. What is equally evident is the truth that life-energy, or prana, flows in many channels: the energy of dance, of music, of thought, and of literature; and also the
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A recipient of the Sahitya Akademi Award, Chaturvedi Badrinath was one of the leading figures in Indian philosophy. His unique and accessible approach ranged across a variety of philosophical concerns. Originally published in the Times of India, the following is an extract from Chaturvedi Badrinath: Unity of Life and Other Essays, edited by his daughter Tulsi Badrinath, which presents the complex ideas of Indian philosophy in simple language. That life is energy, is evident. What is equally evident is the truth that life-energy, or prana, flows in many channels: the energy of dance, of music, of thought, and of literature; and also the energy at the stock exchange. It assumes many forms: the energy in earth and in water, and the energy of the human mind and of the human heart. It takes many names: love is energy, and hatred is energy, too. What is not evident, though, although true, is the fact that there exists, at its very heart, a profound paradox. The highest form of energy. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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