How to polish your résumé

I’ve read a lot of résumés over the years. I’ve read 35-page résumés from senior academics documenting every Rotary talk, guest lecture, and letter to the editor. I’ve read not-quite-one-page
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I’ve read a lot of résumés over the years. I’ve read 35-page résumés from senior academics documenting every Rotary talk, guest lecture, and letter to the editor. I’ve read not-quite-one-page résumés from high school students giving their neighbors as references. In the process, I’ve come to think of résumé reading as an acquired literary taste, like flarf or fanfiction. And I’ve come to think of résumé writing as a unique genre with its own rhetorical nuances and conventions. All of us will need to update a résumé periodically, whether for job-hunting, promotions in an organization, free-lance work, or service on a board of something-or-other. So we should be paying attention to those nuances. Let’s start with audience, which is usually a hiring committee. Hiring committees read résumés in the context of a particular job and often have a scoring grid or rubric prepared by human resources. The rubric asks two questions. Do you meet the minimum qualifications in terms of degrees, types. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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