Adorno's Modernism: Art, Experience, and Catastrophe

2016.03.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Espen Hammer, Adorno's Modernism: Art, Experience, and Catastrophe, Cambridge University Press, 2015, 228pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.03.09 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Espen Hammer, Adorno's Modernism: Art, Experience, and Catastrophe, Cambridge University Press, 2015, 228pp., $99.99 (hbk), ISBN 9781107121591. Reviewed by Owen Hulatt, University of York Adorno's Aesthetic Theory was published posthumously in 1969. Though incomplete, it nonetheless represented a culmination of a life-time's engagement with modernism. From the young Adorno's study with Alban Berg, to his critical reception of Jazz published in 1936 under the pseudonym 'Hektor Rottweiler', through to the scorn he poured on Stravinsky in Philosophy of the New Music in 1947, and finally in the culiminating posthumous work Aesthetic Theory itself, Adorno was a passionate, yet in many and important ways non-dogmatic[1], advocate of the power and necessity of artistic modernism. F. R. Leavis, in 1932's New Bearings in English Poetry, recognized modernism -- in particular that of the poets T.S. Eliot, Ezra Pound. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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