What the Body Commands: The Imperative Theory of Pain

2016.03.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Colin Klein, What the Body Commands: The Imperative Theory of Pain, MIT Press, 2015, 210pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN
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2016.03.05 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Colin Klein, What the Body Commands: The Imperative Theory of Pain, MIT Press, 2015, 210pp., $40.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780262029704. Reviewed by Matthew Fulkerson, University of California, San Diego In this book, Colin Klein offers a strikingly original theory of pain. He nicely combines a range of empirical data and careful argumentation to defend an austere, imperative view of pain. The view is intentionalist, holding that the phenomenal character of pain is fully explained by appeal to its content. Unlike other intentionalist views, Klein argues that the content of pain is not indicative -- it does not inform us of bodily damage, for instance -- but it is a standing command instructing us to act in specific ways to protect the body. This change in sensory mood, he argues, secures many advantages over descriptive and non-intentionalist alternatives. The book can be roughly divided into three parts. In the. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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