The ethics of war

People often do not associate war and ethics with one another, given the death, conflict, and senselessness that typically arises. However, in this sampling from Military Ethics: What Everyone Needs
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People often do not associate war and ethics with one another, given the death, conflict, and senselessness that typically arises. However, in this sampling from Military Ethics: What Everyone Needs to Know®, author George Lucas argues that ethics are not only paramount in military service, but typically more complex than “good versus evil.” How can we talk about ethics in war, when people are deliberately killing each other? This question expresses a common misconception that has a grain of truth. Of course killing people and destroying property are morally wrong in virtually all societies, under normal conditions. The only way we would not categorically condemn these actions is if they were an unavoidable part of our attempts to stop something that was even worse. Simply put, the use of lethal force is morally justifiable only if war is the only remaining way we have available to us to prevent or avoid something even more terrible. The premise of ethics pertaining to. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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