Kant's Transcendental Idealism

[New Entry by Nick Stang on March 4, 2016.] In the Critique of Pure Reason Kant argues that space and time are merely formal features of how we perceive objects, not things in themselves that exist
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[New Entry by Nick Stang on March 4, 2016.] In the Critique of Pure Reason Kant argues that space and time are merely formal features of how we perceive objects, not things in themselves that exist independently of us, or properties or relations among them. Objects in space and time are said to be "appearances", and he argues that we know nothing of substance about the things in themselves of which they are appearances. Kant calls this doctrine (or set of doctrines) "transcendental idealism", and ever since the publication...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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