Towards the Critique of Violence: Walter Benjamin and Giorgio Agamben

2016.03.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Brendan Moran and Carlo Salzani (eds.), Towards the Critique of Violence: Walter Benjamin and Giorgio Agamben, Bloomsbury, 2015,
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2016.03.02 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Brendan Moran and Carlo Salzani (eds.), Towards the Critique of Violence: Walter Benjamin and Giorgio Agamben, Bloomsbury, 2015, 251pp., $112.00 (hbk), ISBN 9781472523242. Reviewed by Jason Maxwell, Pennsylvania State University Although his work assembles a dizzying array of thinkers and texts from the past and present, Giorgio Agamben's debt to Walter Benjamin should not be underestimated. When asked in a 1985 interview to reflect upon his initial introduction to Benjamin's writing in the 1960s, Agamben remarked that the German "immediately made the strongest impression on me: for no other author have I felt such an unsettling affinity" (5). Benjamin's "Critique of Violence," first published in 1921, ranks among the pieces that have had the strongest influence on Agamben's thought. The essay informs the entirety of Homo Sacer, Agamben's best-known work, and many of its key theoretical concepts, including. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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