Political profanity and crude creativity on the campaign trail

In the United States, thoughts are turning to the start of the primary season, when votes are cast to choose each party’s presidential nominee. It’s a complicated and sometimes very long process,
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In the United States, thoughts are turning to the start of the primary season, when votes are cast to choose each party’s presidential nominee. It’s a complicated and sometimes very long process, beginning in Iowa and winding all the way to the conventions in the summer, and every time it gets going, there are certain buzzwords that seem to find their way into the American popular consciousness. Flip-flop first became widely used in 2004, and could anyone forget hanging chads back in 2000? Not to mention the “hopey changey stuff” mentioned by Barack Obama and derided by Sarah Palin in 2008. Refudiating real words In fact, Ms. Palin has made her return for this election to endorse one especially colourful candidate who’s been notable for the use of a different, more vernacular—and some say vulgar—language on the campaign trail. Speaking up in favour of Donald Trump, she managed to come up with at least one word that’s also not made it into the dictionary thus. . .

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News source: Linguistics – OUPblog

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