Negative Public Perceptions of Philosophical Research

Philosophy is not always perceived as well as philosophers would like. There are public discussions of whether philosophy has any value at all (The New York Times or The Chronicle of Higher
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Philosophy is not always perceived as well as philosophers would like. There are public discussions of whether philosophy has any value at all (The New York Times or The Chronicle of Higher Education). Members of our own draft manifestos criticizing philosophy's contributions to the academy (see Glymour’s “Manifesto” or Thagard’s “Eleven Dogmas of Analytic Philosophy”). Presidential candidates quip we need less philosophers.In the latest incident, my personal childhood hero, Bill Nye got skeptical with BigThink about how far philosophical methods can take you in life, compared to say, scientific ones:  What contributes to negative opinions about philosophical research?There are certainly a number of contributing factors. In a recent paper, John Turri and I ran some studies to investigate one potential factor. What we wanted to know was whether negative opinions are partly due to suspicion about the way philosophers conduct their research. To investigate this question, we examined how. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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