Are you really free? Yes: a new argument for freedom

How is human freedom really possible in the natural world as correctly described by modern physics, chemistry, biology, and cognitive neuroscience? Or, given the truth of modern science, are you
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How is human freedom really possible in the natural world as correctly described by modern physics, chemistry, biology, and cognitive neuroscience? Or, given the truth of modern science, are you really free? By ‘real freedom,’ I mean ‘real free will and real rational agency,’ which in turn means: First, you really can choose and do what you want to, or refrain from so choosing or doing, thus without being in any way compelled or prevented by irresistible inner or outer forces (real free will). Second, you really can self-consciously choose and do what you want to, for reasons, and with real moral responsibility (real rational agency). By ‘real moral responsibility’ for X, I mean: First, X is something you really chose or did, whose objective moral value flows from and directly attaches to your really free choice or action. And second, real moral responsibility requires real freedom—if you weren’t free to choose or do X, you couldn’t be responsible. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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