No time to think

On leaving school, my advisor reminded me to always take time to think. That seemed like a reasonable suggestion, as I trudged off to teach, write, and, of course, think. But the modern academy
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On leaving school, my advisor reminded me to always take time to think. That seemed like a reasonable suggestion, as I trudged off to teach, write, and, of course, think. But the modern academy doesn’t share this value; faculty are increasingly prodded to “produce” more articles, more presentations, more grant applications, and more PhD students. Nobel prize-winner Peter Higgs remarked on the breakneck pace of today’s scholarship saying, “It’s difficult to imagine how I would ever have enough peace and quiet in the present sort of climate to do what I did in 1964.” But having no time to think is not exclusive to the academy, even though the irony there is quite thick. This development is attached to a much larger phenomenon – the quickening of social time. Professional and personal life is simply moving faster and faster. Businesses have always competed to do things better, as in, quicker. Employers and managers expect minute-to-minute attention through smart phones, even on. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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