The traumatising language of risk in mental health nursing

Despite progress in the care and treatment of mental health problems, violence directed at self or others remains high in many parts of the world. Subsequently, there is increasing attention to risk
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Despite progress in the care and treatment of mental health problems, violence directed at self or others remains high in many parts of the world. Subsequently, there is increasing attention to risk assessment in mental health. But it this doing more harm than good? The continuing focus on risk, well-intentioned as it is in reducing harm and increasing people’s safety, has a stigmatising, and, in some cases, traumatic effect on people using mental health services. It reinforces the myth that people who are mentally unwell are an inevitable risk to society, and that through risk assessment we can minimise or even eliminate this threat. It is the often unquestioned acceptance of the effectiveness of risk assessment, and the unconscious bias that emerges from this narrative that poses the biggest risk. Why do we need risk assessment? Risk assessment seeks to identify the likelihood of harm to self or others with a view to preventing or minimising such harm. National crime statistics and. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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