A world with persons but without states

Kantian ethical anarchism is ethical anti-statism. It says that there is no adequate rational justification for political authority, the state, or any other state-like institution, and that we
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I have a question for you: what do Caesar, Genghis Khan, Napoleon, Hitler and the Nazis, Stalin, and ISIS all have in common? Answer: they’re all ultra-statists. This is the third in a trilogy of OUP blog posts. The two earlier posts were also serious exercises in “entry-level” Kantian ethical anarchism. Kantian ethical anarchism is ethical anti-statism. It says that there is no adequate rational justification for political authority, the state, or any other state-like institution, and that we should reject and exit the state and other state-like institutions, in order to create and belong to a real-world, worldwide ethical community, aka humanity, in a world without any states or state-like institutions. I’ll start my argument with the basic Kantian premise that all human persons, aka people, are (i) absolutely intrinsically, non-denumerably infinitely valuable, beyond all possible economics, which means they have dignity, and (ii) autonomous rational animals, which means they can. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Philosophy

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