Discourse Representation Theory

[Revised entry by Bart Geurts, David I. Beaver, and Emar Maier on December 24, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] In the early 1980s, Discourse Representation Theory (DRT) was
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[Revised entry by Bart Geurts, David I. Beaver, and Emar Maier on December 24, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] In the early 1980s, Discourse Representation Theory (DRT) was introduced by Hans Kamp as a theoretical framework for dealing with issues in the semantics and pragmatics of anaphora and tense (Kamp 1981); a very similar theory was developed independently by Irene Heim (1982). The distinctive features of DRT, to be discussed below, are that it is a mentalist and representationalist theory of interpretation, and that it is a theory of the interpretation not only of individual sentences but of discourse, as well. In these respects DRT made a clear break with classical formal semantics, which during...

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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