Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy

2015.12.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Justin E. H. Smith, Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy, Princeton University Press,
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2015.12.15 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Justin E. H. Smith, Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy, Princeton University Press, 2015, 296pp., $39.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780691153643. Reviewed by Lauren Guilmette, Florida Atlantic University Justin E. H. Smith bridges an unexpected intersection that may be of interest to two 'kinds' of readers: primarily, to scholars of early modern philosophy, offering a unique interpretation of Leibniz and his theory of "unity-in-diversity" in the context of early modern global conquest; second, to critical philosophers of race, with whom Smith attempts to place himself in conversation. Filling a gap he perceives in the historical ontology of 'race', Smith engages the conditions that make it "possible to say some things, and not others, about human nature and human difference" in Western modernity (7). Placing violent dehumanization, exploitation, and their rationalization in a. . .

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News source: Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // News

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