You’ll be a man, my son. Part 3

Obviously, I would not have embarked on such a long manhunt if I did not have my idea on the origin of the troublesome word. It will probably end up in the dustbin (also known as ash heap) of
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Obviously, I would not have embarked on such a long manhunt if I did not have my idea on the origin of the troublesome word. It will probably end up in the dustbin (also known as ash heap) of etymology, but there it will come to rest in good company. It seems that the Goths and the Old Scandinavians preserved the early stage of secularizing Mannus’s name (Mannus, let me repeat, was, according to Tacitus, the supreme deity of the Early Germanic peoples). Gothic had the noun gaman (neuter; ga– is a collective prefix) “fellowship” and (!) “partner.” Old Norse man, neuter or feminine (!), meant “bondsman” and “maid; concubine.” Old Norse had lost all prefixes before the earliest texts in that language were recorded, so that man in it can be an exact analog of Gothic gaman.   I suggest that in the beginning gaman referred to a group of Mannus’s worshipers (by the way, the most ancient form of Mannus had one n, and that is why in the earlier posts I sometimes enclosed the second n in. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Linguistics

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