Intuitive Resistance is the Mind-Killer

In a recent McSweeney’s article, Kyle York proposes some interesting takes on familiar ethical dilemmas with the potential to help reveal something truly fundamental about moral judgment. For
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In a recent McSweeney’s article, Kyle York proposes some interesting takes on familiar ethical dilemmas with the potential to help reveal something truly fundamental about moral judgment. For instance, pull or no pull: “There’s an out of control trolley speeding towards four workers. You have the ability to pull off your head and turn it into a Chinese lantern. Your head floats into the sky until it takes the place of the sun. You look down upon the planet. It is as small as the eye of a moth. The moth flies away.”Clearly a particular way of doing philosophy and moral psychology is being mocked. Philosophers and psychologists often rely on unrealistic thought experiments and experimental stimuli when conducting their research. To be fair, they do tend to avoid the surreal, but this does raise an interesting question. How worried should we be that deep down, we don’t actually believe the things we are asked to imagine as we make philosophically and psychologically relevant judgments. . .

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News source: Experimental Philosophy

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