Thomas Jefferson

[New Entry by M. Andrew Holowchak on November 17, 2015.] Scholars in general have not taken seriously Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826) as a philosopher, perhaps because he never wrote a formal
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[New Entry by M. Andrew Holowchak on November 17, 2015.] Scholars in general have not taken seriously Thomas Jefferson (1743 - 1826) as a philosopher, perhaps because he never wrote a formal philosophical treatise. Yet Jefferson was a prodigious writer, who left behind a rich philosophical legacy in his declarations, presidential messages and addresses, public papers, numerous bills, letters to philosophically minded correspondents, and his only book, Notes on the State of Virginia. Scrutiny of those writings reveals a refined political philosophy as well as a systemic approach to a philosophy of education in partnership with it. Jefferson's political philosophy and his views on education were undergirded and guided by a consistent and progressive vision of humans, their place in the cosmos, and the good life that owed much to ancient philosophers like Epictetus, Antoninus, and Cicero; to the ethical precepts of Jesus; to coetaneous Scottish empiricists like Francis Hutcheson and. . .

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News source: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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