Emojis and ambiguity in the digital medium

The selection of emoji by Oxford Dictionaries as its Word of the Year recognises the huge increase in the use of these digital pictograms in electronic communication. While 2015 may have witnessed
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Oxford Dictionaries has selected emoji as Word of the Year 2015, so we asked several experts to comment on the role that emojis play in language. The selection of emoji by Oxford Dictionaries as its Word of the Year recognises the huge increase in the use of these digital pictograms in electronic communication. While 2015 may have witnessed their proliferation, emoji are not new. They were originally developed in Japan in the 1990s for use by teenagers on their pagers; the word emoji derives from the Japanese e ‘picture’ + moji ‘character, letter’. Its successful integration into English has no doubt been facilitated by its resemblance to other words that begin with the e- prefix – a contraction of electronic – found in words like e-mail, e-cigarette, and e-commerce. The success of emoji is a direct consequence of the digital medium in which they are used. Electronic communication is a form of writing that resembles a casual conversation more than. . .

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News source: OUPblog » Linguistics

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